Aug 07

An Obstructed View

IMG-20120719-00700I find nothing more frustrating than having my view blocked.  To only be able to see a bit of something wonderful is quite possibly something that could me over the edge.  I remember as a child attending a MN Vikings football game and having an obstructed view ticket.  This did not bother me that much because the conversation with the women around me was much more exciting than the game in front of me.  Side note: this has nothing to do with the Vikings themselves -  though, now that I am an adult, I might have to say that was the root of the problem.

However, if this had been a University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux hockey game, I am quite sure that I would have been upset.  I love the Sioux!  And I love hockey…so missing any of that game would have been a tragedy (side note again – mostly for my son’s amusement): I realize that using tragedy in relation to a mere hockey game is an exaggeration, but I do love hockey!).

In the same way, I love the ocean, and missing any of that view makes me upset.

On my trip to the east coast a few weeks ago, I spent a few days alone in Rockport, MA.  I did a lot of walking, and I saw a lot of great views.  I also saw a lot of views through gate doors and between houses.  I found that my view was obstructed often, and that bothered me.  I like to be able to see what I love.

Sometimes the only thing to do is to move so that I get what I want.

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Very often, we forget that we are the mobile ones in most scenarios.  If I wanted to see the ocean better, I just needed to move.  The ocean was not going to go anywhere, and the Blue Gate had no intention of letting me inside.  I needed to move if I had any hope of getting what I wanted – a view of something beautiful.

I realized some things as I stared through the Blue Gate and contemplated this.

  • I tend to focus on the door (or something/someone who seems like a door).
  • Sometimes I do not think about the fact that I am the one who needs to move in a situation or relationship.
  • Quite often, I refuse to do what is necessary to move beyond a road block in a situation.
  • I miss out on great things because of this.

In this particular situation, it was pretty obvious that I just needed to get moving in order to get a view of the ocean.  However, for those times when it is not so obvious, I need to consider how I can change and make a situation better.  When not-so-physical doors get in the way of great opportunities, I need to step back and consider how my “location” in a situation or relationship could change in order to bring about an excellent result.

In what way will I need to move today?  In what relationship might I need to be the one who makes a step around a barrier?  How will I focus less on the door and more on the view?

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